Malawian Migrants Blame Financial Woes On Zimbabwe Sanctions

Malawi
Last group of Malawians arrive in Lilongwe on 12 April 2019.

Malawian nationals living in Zimbabwe have been severely affected by their host country’s economic tailspin.

Zimbabwe is home to thousands of Malawian migrants and their descendants who settled in the country from nearly 50 years ago.

When the Zimbabwean economy was still stable, the migrants used to send their earnings to relatives back home.

But this has been affected by Zimbabwe’s economic mess that has seen ordinary workers fail to make ends meet.

Likewise, Malawians living in Zimbabwe have been caught up in the quicksand.

In an interview with NewZimbabwe.com Thursday, Kholisile Kaclepa, who chairs Malawi National Association (MNA), singled out sanctions imposed on Zimbabwe by America and Europe as the main cause of Malawians’ misery.

“Our parents came here to Zimbabwe 49 years ago looking for greener pastures, worked here for the rest of their lives. They are now retired and life has not been rosy,” said Kaclepa, who is based in Malawi and is visiting Zimbabwe.

“So now, we have to send them money from Malawi looking after them but they used to send money back to Malawi because they were having surplus.”

“Now the story has changed and because of these illegal sanction; it’s very painful. We can feel the pinch even our children too feel the pinch.

“It has affected trade… .”

Meanwhile, Zanu PF national commissar Victor Matemadanda has called on all Zimbabweans regardless of political affiliation to join the October 25 anti-sanction march.

Matemadanda said the campaign was not a Zanu PF preserve but concerned all Zimbabweans affected by the Western embargo.

“This is a national event and we all upon all Zimbabweans to come on the day and show solidarity for the removal of the illegal sanctions,” he said.

“We are also calling upon political parties to mobilise their supporters to come and march on the day so that we show the world that the sanctions have affected ordinary people.

“Let their supporters come in numbers and fill up the National Sports Stadium.”

Zimbabwe was 2001 and 2003 slapped with restrictions by the US and the European for alleged rights abuses and poll theft by the now defunct Robert Mugabe regime.

Since the time, calls by the Zanu PF led government to scrap the embargo have fallen on deaf ears as the foreign powers have kept the clamp on the country.

Amid the calls, SADC countries have agreed to join their troubled neighbour in calling for the removal of the measures during concurrent activities set to be held October 25 in their respective territories.