5 shortest-serving African leaders you need to know

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Robert Guei

African leaders are known for their desire to be presidents for life, and many of them resort to unscrupulous ways to ensure that they can hold on to power for as long as possible.

From extending presidential terms to delaying elections, African leaders sure do have some tricks up their sleeves to entice or compel the people to keep them in power. Others resort to violence and war just to prove this point, all to the detriment of the people and the country’s resources.

But do you know that there are African leaders who served some of the shortest terms on the continent? Whether they resigned, were deposed or assassinated, these presidents did not really enjoy their time in power.

Check them out.

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Mohamed Morsi

Mohamed Morsi

At the height of the Egyptian Spring, Mohammed Morsi had been the president of the country for almost a year. His presidency faced a number of upheavals but the most memorable one was the June 2013 uprising that demanded his resignation. Although he tried everything to hold on to power, his efforts were thwarted, and he was overthrown by General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the incumbent president.

Michel Djotodia
Michel Djotodia

Michel Djotodia

Djotodia was the president of the Central African Republic from
March 24, 2013, to January 10, 2014.  He was a rebel leader facing up to Francois Bozize and the peace talks between the two factions fell through in March 2013, with the former accusing the latter of failing to fulfill his promises.

After taking power, the division on religious lines escalated and Djotodia was forced to resign just a few months later. He went to exile in Benin

Robert Guei
Robert Guei

Robert Guei

When Henri Konan Bédié was deposed in 1999, Robert Guei was installed as the president of the Ivory Coast. Little did he know that his term would be over in less than a year.

In October 2000, he run for president against Laurent Gbagbo, the only candidate he had allowed to run against him, only to be beaten resoundingly by the latter. Guei refused to hand over power leading to chaos in the city, which eventually forced him to flee the country.

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Melchior Ndadaye

Melchior Ndadaye

Ndadaye was the president of Burundi for four months. He got into power as the first democratically elected president on July 10, 1993, and was assassinated on October 21, 1993.  What happened exactly on the day of his death is not well-known, even though it has been said that he was abducted together with the president and vice-president of the national assembly and killed.  He was apparently bayoneted to death.

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Yusuf Kironde Lule

Yusuf Kironde Lule

For only 68 days, Lule was the president of Uganda. He was named acting president immediately after Idi Amin was ousted. At the time, he was the leader of the Uganda National Liberation Front (UNLF). He was eventually deposed by the National Consultative Commission, the quasi-parliament that had elected him to power in the first place.

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